My Two Dads

I came across this on an old blog I used to keep, and thought it appropiate to post for Father’s Day.

Once upon a time I had two dads, one with hard brown eyes and the other with soft ones.

The dad with the hard eyes was a police officer who worked long shifts. He had a short temper and shouted at us for making too much noise.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing, long hours, four children, and a wage that was barely enough to support a family.

I hated it when mum used those words, “Wait till your dad gets home!” The sound of the front door closing made me dread those hard, flat, angry eyes,

“Apologise to your mother,” or “Get up to your room now!” Was what he usually said.

It was worse when I got older and given a curfew,  as all my friends were allowed to come home when they liked. Dad always wanted to know where I was going and who I was going with. He disapproved of my ‘going into town’ because that was ‘his patch’ and he knew all the bad pubs and clubs. Without explanation he would ban me.

Now I know he was being protective and although it caused conflict,  I hated him laying down the law.

Now I just wish he was back here with me where we could talk about it, and I could tell him how I finally understood.

My other dad, the one with soft brown eyes, would make me laugh. “Give me your hand and I shall tell your fortune,” he would say. Then taking hand he’d peered at it, “I can see a farmhouse,” I looked closely and saw nothing but a criss-cross of lines. “And here,” he said, “is a pond.” Then he spat in my hand.

“Dad!” I would scream, and it was funny as I watched him do it to my siblings.

Holidays were fun too. We’d walk up hills and down the other side. We’d collect seashells on the beach and climb rocks. He built us, not just sand castles, but racing cars with seats and steering wheels.

He’d cover us in sand so that just our head was showing, or take us to a field where we would chase moles that only he could see.

Whereever he went, we followed. He’d do silly things like walk with a limp and we’d copy him, or he’d run and then walk and we’d all bang into each other.

He couldn’t tell a joke because he’d always forget the punch line, or the laughter in his eyes gave it all away.

The police officer finally hung up his helmet and the hard brown eyes became soft all the time.

Now we’ve grown up and left home, Dad and Mum had a their second family, four adopted children. They never saw the policeman with the hard eyes.

Dad eventually ran our of energy to run along beaches and began to walk with a real limp.  He still continued to tells fortunes, and his laughing eyes always gave away the jokes.

He died of pancreatic cancer in September 2010. Every father’s day, I remember these things and they make me smile.

Just Our Imagination

I was reading through other WordPress sites, as you do, and came across this interesting article about riding a bike.

It took me back to being a child when when played on the streets for hours with them. My brother and I used to pretend they were horses and we had an army of men. We’d ride down the centre of the road beckoning behind us with our hands, shouting “Come on, men!” Ten thousand men followed us!

What sticks in my mind the most is how I think back tand there really was ten thousand men there and we were on horseback, not our bikes. There really is nothing like a child’s imagination.

Read the full article called Look Mum, No Hands! on Stevie Turner’s blog.

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Love Quilts UK

by Karen J Mossman

It’s been a while since I stitched anything for Love Quilts and when an email dropped into my mail box recently thanking for me my contribution, I was suprised, and delighted. That was when I remembered how much I loved cross stitching fo them.

Love Quilts UK makes quilts for children under the age of nineteen who suffer from life threatening or life long illnesses.

I started stitching for them in 2012 when I applied for one for my sister. Each quilt contains twelve cross stitch squares and the child or parent chooses the theme.

As a stitcher, you would check the website regularly to see if any quilts were opening up and failing that, you can stitch an ‘Any Child’ square. These are usually used to make up emergency quilts, or to fill an incomplete quilt.

So the email I received was an ‘Any Child’ square I had stitched in May 2013. So no wonder I had forgoten! In the email, we usually get a message from the family. and in this one we received the following:

“Thank you so much for the absolutely amazing quilt, we as a family are completely in love with it. The detail and quality is completely incredible.”

It makes it so worthwhile seeing this messages and having been on the receiving end, I really don’t know which is more of a thrill – receiving the quilt or seeing a quilt I have contributed to.

You can see all the squares I’ve stiched here.

All these quilts are simply stunning, don’t you think?

#crossstitch #quilting #sickchildren #children #charity #quilts #love #children

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